The Earth Ring

Hi again folks, thanks for coming back! Firstly, I wanted to say a big thank you to everyone who has checked out my first post on this website. It was very well received!
As my final semester at Dalhousie University starts to come to a close, items on my personal and professional check-list are starting to be marked as complete. One of those items being the acquisition of my Earth Ring. I realize that this piece of jewelry sounds like something out of a film based on a free-spirited, Middle Earth-loving Hobbit hippie mash-up. But I can assure you that it is much more meaningful. I have compiled information about the ring and its accompanying ceremony below. It is quite a neat little thing to be a part of. The majority of the information comes from myepsa.ca.

The Earth Science Ring Ceremony, a ritual of welcome into the profession of newly qualified geologists and geophysicists by senior practicing Earth scientists, started in Alberta in 1975. This yearly tradition for the university geoscience graduating classes at Edmonton and Calgary has spread to other provinces and jurisdictions in Canada. The ceremony carries many of the same passages written for the Engineers’ Iron Ring Ceremony and symbolizes the commitment and responsibility that come with the title of a professional. The Earth Ring reflects the individual values of practising Geoscientists and the trust society places in them.

Like the Engineer’s Iron Ring, the Earth Science Ring’s simplicity and strength bear witness to the calling of the geologist and geophysicist. The ring is made of silver and marked with the crossed hammer of geology and with the seismic trace of geophysics -signifying both the immediate and the remote searching out of nature’s knowledge. Without beginning and without end, it also represents for those who wear it, the continuous interplay of ideas and of material realities.

The ceremony includes a speech by senior Earth scientists and an obligation (pledge) taken by the group of newly graduated geologists and geophysicists. The ring is presented by the Association of Professional Geoscientists of Nova Scotia (APGNS).

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